Nagare

Nagare:

Flow, flowing like a stream.
To create loss free processes it is the target to make things flow in a natural way, to make the work place come alive where you can see its heart beat and feel its tempo.

Mizenboshi

Mizenboshi:

Prevent problems to be able to manifest; stop a problem before it exists.
Organizing work in a way that before a problem is going to occur it is already detected.
Countermeasures automatically take place to avoid the problem from occurring.

Kino

Kino: Function

What does it really do?
By truly understanding the function of something, it can be reduced to its simplest form.

Aimai

Aimai: Vague, ambiguous.

Used to describe a situation, layout or instruction that is unclear and non-specific and causing confusion.

Even the most critical business process in most companies (yes even within the ones with big names) earn the title AIMAI.
The fact that things nevertheless keep on going, is due to the workforce that seams to be able to perform miracles every day, not due to the smooth and unambiguous processes and organization.

Anshin

Anshin: Peace of mind, Mindful

Describes the condition where things are made clear and a person’s mind can rest easy from worry.

Hinshitsu

Hinshitsu: Quality; it also means natural. Quality is a natural or normal state. Defects are an abnormal state.

There are two kinds of quality:
•atarimae hinshitsu – The idea that things will work as they are supposed to (e.g. a pen will write.)
•miryokuteki hinshitsu – The idea that things should have an aesthetic quality which is different from “atarimae hinshitsu” (e.g. a pen will write in a way that is pleasing to the writer, and leave behind ink that is pleasing to the reader).

In the design of goods or services, atarimae hinshitsu and miryokuteki hinshitsu together ensure that a creation will both work to customers’ expectations and also be desirable to have.

Hinshitsu Kanri = Statistical Quality Control

Hiku – Osu

Hiku: Pull, drag, draw stretch.
The condition of completed work creating a vacuum that draws the next unit to be worked on only when it is needed.

Versus:

Osu: Shoving, pushing.
The condition that pushes work in advance of demand and creates waste.

Zen

Zen: Often translated as: The ideal state, ideal harmony, the natural way of things, good.

Actually, Zen is a school of Buddhism. The word is derived from the Sanskrit dhyāna, which means “meditation” and translated via the Chinese Chán to the Japanese Zen.

Zen emphasizes experiential wisdom, particularly as realized in the form of meditation, in the attainment of enlightenment.
As such, it de-emphasizes theoretical knowledge in favor of direct, experiential realization through meditation and dharma (one’s righteous duty) practice.

It is difficult to express the feeling behind this word,
maybe you want to try this little Zen Experience

Zazen

Zazen: literally “seated meditation”

Zazen is at the heart of Zen Buddhist practice. The aim of zazen is just sitting in meditation and creating a state of mind where the mind is able to be unhindered by its many layers (our ego), one will then be able to realize one’s true ‘Buddha nature’ or ‘true self’.
In Zen Buddhism, zazen is a meditative discipline practitioners perform to calm the body and the mind and experience insight into the nature of existence and thereby gain enlightenment (satori).

The posture of zazen is seated, with folded legs and hands, and an erect but settled spine. The legs are folded in one of the standard sitting styles (see below).
The hands are folded together into a simple mudra over the belly. In many practices, one breathes from the hara (the center of gravity in the belly) and the eyelids are half-lowered, the eyes being neither fully open nor shut so that the practitioner is not distracted by outside objects but at the same time is kept awake.

The amount of time spent daily in zazen by practitioners varies.
Five minutes or more daily is beneficial for householders.
The key is daily regularity, as Zen teaches that the ego will naturally resist, and the discipline of regularity is essential.
Practicing Zen monks may perform four to six periods of zazen during a normal day, with each period lasting 30 to 40 minutes.

The amount of time spent daily in zazen by practitioners varies. Dōgen recommends that five minutes or more daily is beneficial for householders. The key is daily regularity, as Zen teaches that the ego will naturally resist, and the discipline of regularity is essential. Practicing Zen monks may perform four to six periods of zazen during a normal day, with each period lasting 30 to 40 minutes.

Successive periods of zazen are usually interwoven with brief periods of walking meditation (kinhin) to relieve the legs.

Sesshin

Sesshin: literally “gathering the mind”

A period of intensive meditation (zazen) in a Zen monastery, or in a western Zen centre.

While the daily routine in the monastery requires the monks to meditate several hours a day, during a sesshin they devote themselves almost exclusively to zazen practice.

During the whole Sesshin everything -short rest breaks, meals, and sometimes short periods of work- is performed with the same mindfulness.
During the sesshin period, the meditation practice is occasionally interrupted by the master giving public talks (teisho) and individual direction in private meetings with a Zen Master.

In modern Buddhist practice in Japan and the West, sesshins are typically one, three, five, or seven days in length. Seven-day sesshins are held several times a year at many Zen centers.